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This is from a question I asked on stack-exchange:
http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/88703/do-you-feel-bad-when-you-have-to-learn-new-things

New thing is not always cool.

I see many people say they are very bored by doing the similar things day after day. For me it's the opposite - I'm always learning something new. During the last one and a harf year, nearly every two months I need to do lots of researches on a totally new topic: RTMP, MP4, SIP, VNC, Smooth streaming, ..., I have to read lots of specifications, download tones of open source projects to understand concepts, and turn them into my runnable code.

And it was so bad! My brain has never been very sure and very familiar with anything, and when it's close to be sure and familiar, it'll have to switch to next thing. I kind of envy people who build upper level applications because they can be very focusing, and their knowledge set includes most things their job requires. Everything is quite measurable, direct and straightforward.

Have you ever had the similar feeling? I'm thinking of asking my boss to assign me some other piece of work so that I work like moving forward on a broad road instead of figuring out a way in the dark, I think it'll be more relaxing, any suggestion?

The accepted answer:

It's about balance. Never learning anything new is ... unstimulating. That is terrible.

Equally, always having to rush to learn things, and never enjoying the thrill of mastering something, is exhausting.

As a developer you should never stop learning. And sometimes you'll have to learn slightly irrelevant things - legacy systems and the like. All that's okay, so long as you're not always poking around uncertainly in the dark.

The worst part about that is you're probably being treated as the 'expert', and you feel the pressure of knowing what you don't know.

I don't think that there's anything wrong with saying that you feel saturated as a 'jack of all trades' and would like to focus more on a particular area. Try to highlight the business benefits. If there aren't any - well, the business needs to focus a bit more.
 


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